Sunday, October 16, 2005

Cured not Cursed

I'm typing this with one hand. On my right hand I'm wearing a big bulky mitt that makes my hand sweat, is uncomfortable, and makes it extremely hard to use my dominant hand. For twelve hours today, I have "leprosy". The mitt is supposed to help me experience what a person with leprosy goes through. It's part of a Canada-wide fundraiser for The Leprosy Mission, called "Cured Not Cursed".

But, the mitt only really gives me the physical experience of a leprosy victim. It doesn't really give me the emotional experience of what someone with leprosy suffers. I still have my family and my home. No one shunned me in church this morning. Instead they were curious about why we were wearing the mitts. My family didn't kick me out of my house, or force me to live in the streets and beg for food. No one was afraid to touch me today.

In a few short hours I will joyfully shed this cumbersome mitt and go about my normal, nice, happy life again. Someone who really has leprosy is not so fortunate.

Around 1500 people each day will be told they have leprosy. Leprosy can be cured and its devastation halted by taking three pills a day for six months. The cost of treatment is about $275 Cdn per person. Such a pitiful small sum to make such a huge difference in someone's life. There is no reason that any child today should have to suffer with leprosy.

Please visit The Leprosy Mission website (www.tlmcanada.org) and consider making a donation. Leprosy can be cured. * o
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3 comments:

Marple said...

Such a good presentation the youth did at church. Hope you collected lots of change and put the seed into some to help these children.

Anonymous said...

Leprosy is certainly curable. The UN agency World Health Organisation (WHO) has provided free multidrug therapy to all endemic countries since 1995, and this free provision will run until at least the end of 2010. See their website http://www.who.int/lep for details.

Some charities still ask for considerable amounts of money to treat the disease even though the MDT drugs are free.

Anonymous said...

This made me remember that while I was in a private school for girls in the early 60, there was an hospital close by where they had a wing for people with leprosy( i think they were about 8 of them)We used to go sing for them...they were on the balcony...we were on the grass below. I have to google this to see if that is on the web ...yes it is (Tracadie, NB leprosy)

simonne